Sunday, January 15, 2012

Important Links

Site Map



This is a list of all the Web pages http://michiganchimneyrepair.com



About Us Bloomfield Hills Chimney Repair
Brick & Michigan Brickwork Brickwork Deterioration
Brighton Chimney Repair Caring for your brick
Chimney Caps chimney cleaning
Chimney Fires Chimney Leaks
Chimney Repair West Bloomfield Chimney Song
Clarkston Chimney Repair Chimney Sweep Contact Us
Dearborn Chimney Repair Dearborn Heights Chimney Repair
Detroit Chimney Repair DIY Chimney Crown Repair
DIY Replace Damaged Brick DIY Tuckpointing
Farmington Hills Chimney Repair Fenton Chimney Cleaning Chimney repair
Ferndale Chimney Repair fireplacerepair
Franklin Mi Chimney Repair Genesee County Chimney Repair
Grand Blanc Chimney Repair Highland Chimney Cleaners Chimney Repair
Hiring Profesionals Historic Repair Press
Holly Mi Chimney Cleaning and Chimney Repair Home
Lake Orion Mi Chimney Repair Livingston County Chimney Repair
Livonia Chimney Repair Macomb County Chimney Repair
Madisonheightschimneyrepairchimneycleaning Marks Corner
Michigan Brickwork Milford Mi Chimney Cleaning & Chimney Repair
Novi Chimney Cleaning oakland countty mi chimney leak
Oakland County Chimney Repair Redford Mi Chimney repair
Royal Oak MI Chimney Repair Sterling Heights Chimney Repair
Troy, MI, Chimney Repair Types of Masonry Joints
Under Construction Washtenaw County Chimney Repair
Waterford Mi Chimney Repair Wayne County Chimney Repair
White Lake Chimney Repair Chimney Cleaning Winters and Michigan Masonry


--
Mark Allen Maupin "Mr. Brick Repair" (248) 895-7752   WOW Have you ever laid brick in the winter what a miserable job that is.....Glad this winter I get to play the internet game

Check out the Website at nBrick Repair llc
 http://www.MichiganChimneyRepair.com
Http://Oaklandcountychimtp:/neyrepair.com
Http://Chimneyrepairmichigan.com


Saturday, January 14, 2012

Michigan Chimney Crown







 
CHIMNEY REPAIR TIPS REPLACING THE CHIMNEY CROWN


Many times as a homeowner or property investor you will find your chimney in need of some minor chimney repair or chimney sweeping.  The first step is gain access to the chimney. If your chimney is 30 feet tall and inaccessible it may be wise to hire a chimney repair specialist. Most reputable masonry contractors will provide you with a free estimate. Once you have gained access to your chimney you can begin the repair process.

The second step is to assess the level of chimney repair necessary. If your chimney crown is cracked this can often times be a simple enough chimney repair to perform for an experienced do-it-yourselfer. The chimney crown is the top concrete part of the chimney.  Any chimney crown repair begins with the removal of the damaged crown. Most Chimney repair specialist will chip away the concrete with a rotary hammer or pneumatic chisel. As a DIY homeowner an older and more manual method may be necessary to remove the chimney crown. For this I would recommend a chisel, 5 lb sledge hammer, & brick hammer. Of coarse the tool necessary for chimney repair and chimney crown replacement are dependent on the size and thickness of the crown.

Once you have removed the chimney crown inspect the flue on the chimney. The chimney flue liner is the ceramic insert that runs up the center of the chimney. If the flue is cracked it may be time to call in a chimney repair professional. Provided the chimney flu is in sound condition you can begin replacing the chimney crown.  The next step in the chimney repair process is the clean and loose debris and dust of the top of the chimney. Use a stiff bristle brush to clean of any particles.

The next step in the chimney repair process is to mix up some concrete. In most cases I recommend that the DIY homeowner use a redi-mix concrete. When I do a chimney repair I prefer using fiber reinforced crack resistant concrete. I have found that the thicker/stiffer the concrete is mixed the less likely it is to run down the side of the chimney this will make for a cleaner chimney repair. When working in a warmer climate and temperatures exceed 80 degrees on the day you do your chimney repair you will want to mix your concrete more thin/loose.

Make sure to slope your concrete away from the ceramic flue liner to allow for proper water drainage. I find that when you make your chimney crown thicker it makes for a longer lasting chimney repair. On Most chimney repairs on chimney crown pour the concrete 4-7 inches thick at the flue and slope it down to a 2 inch edge. Achieving a smooth finish on your concrete can take years of practice to master but with some patience most DIY homeowners can handle this repair

The above information has been provided for the benefit of the DIY homeowner by Mark Allen Maupin  of Brick Repair LLC (248) 895-7752. Brick Repair LLC Is a local Michigan chimney cleaning and chimney sweeping masonry repair contractor with the last 12 years specialized in masonry restoration and repair. We are experts at matching brick and mortar color We offer free estimates for any of the following services: Chimney repair, Chimney construction, Chimney crown repair, chimney cap replacement, Chimney rebuilds, Chimineas Tuckpointing, Natural stone, Limestone replacement, Cultured stone, brick porch repair, Brick porch construction, Brick wall construction, toothing work, pointing and repointing work, grout replacement, and historic restoration. We look forward to the opportunity to help you with and brick, block or stone project.



Auburn Hills, Beverly Hills, Birmingham, Bloomfield Hills, Bloomfield township, Brighton, Canton, Clarkston, Clawson, Commerce,
Livonia, Madison Heights, Milford, New Hudson, Northville, Novi, Oak Park, Orchard Lake, Orion, Orchard Lake, Ortonville, Pontiac, Redford, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights, Ferndale, Drayton Plains, Eastpointe, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Grosse pointe, Highland, Highland Park, Howell, Hunington Woods, Keego Harbor, Lake Orion, Lathrup Village, Lincoln Park,  Romulus, Roseville, Royal Oak, South Lyon, Southfield, Sterling Heights, Sylvan Lake, Troy, Utica, Walled Lake, Waterford, West Bloomfield, White Lake Oakland County, Wayne County, Macomb County, Livingston County

Check Out these blogs

 

http://michiganbricklaying.blogspot.com

http://oaklandcountychimneycleaning.blogspot.com

http://exteriorbrick.blogspot.com/

http://michiganpainting.blogspot.com

http://michiganmasonrycontractor.blogspot.com

http://chimneyflashing.blogspot.com

http://michiganchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://redfordchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://ferndalechimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://michiganfireplacerepair.blogspot.com

http://bloomfieldchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://bloomfieldchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://oaklandcountychimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://detroitchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://chimneyrepairsoutheastmichigan.blogspot.com

http://clarkstonfirplacerepair.blogspot.com

http://howtobrick.blogspot.com

http://milfordchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://birminghamchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://westbloofieldchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://waterfordchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://troychimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://rochesterchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://royaloakchimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://chimneyrepair.blogspot.com

http://chimneystove.blogspot.com


Check out our other sites

http://www.michiganmasonrycontractors.com

http://www.michiganbrickcompany.com

http://www.michiganbricklayers.com

http://www.bricklayersdetroit.com

http://www.michiganbrickmasonry.com

http://www.oaklandcountychimneyrepair.com

http://www.michiganfireplaces.com

http://www.chimneyrepairrochesterhills.com

http://michiganchimneyrepair.com/default.aspx 

http://www.michiganchimneyrepair.org



--
Mark Allen Maupin "Mr. Brick Repair" (248) 895-7752   WOW Have you ever laid brick in the winter what a miserable job that is.....Glad this winter I get to play the internet game

Check out the Website at nBrick Repair llc
 http://www.MichiganChimneyRepair.com
Http://Oaklandcountychimtp:/neyrepair.com
Http://Chimneyrepairmichigan.com


Michigan Bricklayers (248) 895-7752


Metro Detroit Michigan Masonry Contractor Has Tips on Brick Repair and Brickwork for the Do-it-Yourself Homeowner

When hiring a Michigan masonry contractor is cost prohibitive, homeowners often attempt to do their own repairs. Using these techniques can help produce a quality masonry repair

 

Michigan Masonry Contractors


 

Brick Repair llc


 


Michigan Brick Company



Michigan Bricklayer
(EMAILWIRE.COM, January 14, 2012 ) Detroit MI – Brick chimney repair can be dangerous work. Hiring a masonry contractor can be cost prohibitive for some Michigan homeowners. Mark Maupin, Michigan masonry contractor and president of Brick Repair, LLC provides tips for homeowners who attempt to do it themselves.

The first step to any brick repair job is accessing the damaged area. Brick work on the ground that is easily accessible can often times be tuck pointed without a great deal of difficulty. Tuck-pointing is the replacement of damaged mortar joints. A complete step by step video breakdown of tuck-pointing can be seen at http://michiganchimneyrepair.com/Howto.aspx.

Chimneys can be a completely different matter all together. "If your chimney is very tall and difficult to access safely, then I recommend hiring a chimney repair specialist," said Maupin. "Most reputable chimney repair and masonry contractors will evaluate the extent of repairs to be done and provide a free estimate." The first thing to fail on a chimney is usually the chimney crown. The chimney crown is the concrete on the top of the chimney.

If your chimney is accessible and the chimney crown is cracked this can often times be a simple enough chimney repair to perform for an experienced do-it-yourselfer. The chimney crown is the top concrete part of the chimney. Any chimney crown repair begins with the removal of the damaged crown. Most Chimney repair specialist will chip away the concrete with a rotary hammer or pneumatic chisel. As a DIY homeowner an older and more manual method may be necessary to remove the chimney crown. For this I would recommend a chisel, 5 lb sledge hammer, & brick hammer. Of course the tools necessary for chimney repair and chimney crown replacement are dependent on the size and thickness of the crown.
Once you have removed the chimney crown inspect the flue on the chimney. The chimney flue liner is the ceramic insert that runs up the center of the chimney. If the flue is cracked it may be time to call in a chimney repair professional. Provided the chimney flu is in sound condition you can begin replacing the chimney crown. The next step in the chimney repair process is the clean and loose debris and dust of the top of the chimney. Use a stiff bristle brush to clean off any particles.
The next step in the chimney repair process is to mix up some concrete. In most cases I recommend that the DIY homeowner use a redi-mix concrete. When I do a chimney repair I prefer using fiber reinforced, crack resistant concrete. I have found that the thicker/stiffer the concrete is mixed the less likely it is to run down the side of the chimney. This will make for a cleaner chimney repair. When working in a warmer climate where temperatures are exceeding 80 you will want to mix your concrete more thin/loose/wet.
Make sure to slope your concrete away from the ceramic flue liner to allow for proper water drainage. I find that when you make your chimney crown thicker it makes for a longer lasting chimney repair. On most chimney crown repairs pour the concrete 4-7 inches thick at the flue and slope it down to a 2 inch edge. Achieving a smooth finish on your concrete can take years of practice to master but with some patience most DIY homeowners can handle this repair.


There are several things that can cause problems with chimneys including chimney leaks, creosote build-up that creates a chimney fire hazard, and a cracked chimney crown to name a few. Mark Maupin currently specializes in chimney repair. Read his latest blog post for DIY Chimney repair tips at http://chimneyrepairmichigan.blogspot.com/2010/05/chimne ...

When asked why he tells people how to do what he gets paid to do, Mark said, "I would rather see the job done right than have to come in and repair a botched chimney repair job later. It's easier to fix it right the first time. If the repair is easy enough for the homeowner to do it themselves, then I can spend my time where I'm most needed."

Mark Maupin believes he is doing a great service by providing tips for the DIY homeowner. "It displays honesty and integrity when I'm not hiding behind my knowledge and experience. There will always be someone who needs to hire a professional. As far as I'm concerned, no job is too small, but like most contractors, I prefer to do the bigger jobs. This way, I'm not spending time commuting between jobs."

Mark Maupin of Brick Repair, LLC provides exemplary masonry restoration to damaged buildings, maintaining cosmetic and structural integrity while beautifying the community through expert handiwork. He provides a satisfying customer experience from demolition and rebuilding to debris removal and clean-up. Mark will provide special care for historical buildings in need of restoration to help communities remain structurally sound and pleasing to the eye. Visit http://michiganchimneyrepair.com to learn more.

Brick Repair llc can provide a bricklayer for you in the following communities
Oakland County Michigan, Farmington, Farmington Hills Livonia, Novi , Bloomfield Hills And West Bloomfield
About Brick Repair, LLC they strive to provide exemplary chimney cleaning, sweeping masonry restoration to damaged buildings, maintaining cosmetic and structural integrity while beautifying the community through expert handiwork.they strive to provide a satisfying customer experience from demolition through debris removal. Brick Repair llc provides special care for historical buildings in need of restoration to help communities remain structurally sound and pleasing to the eye


Contact us:
Mark Maupin
Brick Repair, LLC.
(248) 895-7752
Brickrepairllc@gmail.com

Contact Information:
Brick Repair LLC
Mark
Tel: 248 895-7752
--
Mark Allen Maupin "Mr. Brick Repair" (248) 895-7752   WOW Have you ever laid brick in the winter what a miserable job that is.....Glad this winter I get to play the internet game

Check out the Website at nBrick Repair llc
 http://www.MichiganChimneyRepair.com
Http://Oaklandcountychimtp:/neyrepair.com
Http://Chimneyrepairmichigan.com


Sunday, January 16, 2011

Brick Repair (248) 895 7752



At Brick Repair, LLC we recognize the importance of our customers. You are our first priority.
















beautifying the community through expert handiwork. We strive to provide a satisfying customer experience from demolition through debris removal. We wish to provide special care for historical buildings in need of restoration to help communities remain structurally sound & eye pleasing.



HIRING THE CHIMNEY REPAIR PROFESSIONALS BRICK REPAIR LLC

(248) 895-7752

The information below is provided by Brick Repair llc masonry repair and chimney restoration contractor. With 12 years specialized in masonry restoration and Chimney repair. They are experts at matching brick and mortar color for any chimney repair project. Brick Repair llc offers free estimates or answer for any of the following services: Chimney Repair, Chimney rebuilds,Tuckpointing, Natural stone, Limestone replacement, Cultured stone, Fireplace Repair brick porch repair, Brick porch construction, Brick wall construction, pointing and work, grout replacement, and historic chimney repair, Historic restoration. Our Chimney and Fireplace specialist look forward to the opportunity to help you with your brick, block or stone chimney project.

Unfortunately there are a lot of poor chimney repairs out there. On many occasions our chimney and fireplace repairman have had to redo or rebuild a chimney or porch that some one else built or tried to pass of as a quality a chimney repair. We have found chimneys crowned with mortar instead of concrete. Brick replaced by stacking the bond, and countless times where a wall was no where near level or plumb.

When looking for someone to do your Chimney repair buyer beware there are so many fly by night chimney repair companies out there. Don’t be fooled by a slick talking sales man. Have you been told you need to you needed chimney repair, If you have not inspected your chimney personally, don’t take the word of some guy of the street that hands you a business card or flyer. We will provide you with photos of your chimney repair project from start to finish. Your local handyman is not the person to use on you chimney repair, or brick wall repair the masonry field takes years to learn. Use a professional masonry contractor for any of your masonry repairs. Using the tips below will help you find a good masonry contractor for any chimney repair or masonry restoration project.

1. Use insured contractors

2. Use a reputable company
3. Ask for references
4. Look at their previous work or photos of it
5. If your job involves demolition, use a company specialized in it
6. Get something in writing

A lot of very good masonry contractors and chimney repair companies are in business. Don’t let a con man or handy man taking on more than he can handle ruin your brick repair experience



Looking for a Bricklayer in Michigan? Call (248) 895-7752 Specialized in masonry restoration and chimney repair. Our bricklayers can help you with any masonry project. Our services include tuck pointing, brick, chimney repair block, stone replacement, new construction, chimney replacement, chimney repair, porch repair,

chimney cap and crown replacement.

We are happy to serve the following areas when they are in need of chimney repair in Mi. Detroit, Ferndale, Farmington, Highland park, Hamtramck, Farmington Hills, Bloomfield, west Bloomfield, Oak park, Southfield, Hunington Woods, Berkley, Orchard lake, Walled lake, Milford, Commerce, South Lyon, New Hudson, Warren, Rochester Hills, Rochester, Auburn Hills, Oakland County, Wayne County.






Michigan Masonry Contractor Finds Lackluster Brick Repair

Brick Repair LLC,

(EMAILWIRE.COM, February 19, 2007 ) By: Mark Maupin, Jr. a.k.a Mr. Brick Repair.
I was driving down Grand River the other day and was distraught to see so many historical and beautiful brick homes in shambles. Brick homes with the history and beauty of those in Detroit are a rarity. Artistry found on the average brick home in Detroit is reserved for the rich and elite. Few bricklayers have the skill or are willing to spend time and energy to lay such detailed brickwork on the average home. Where have the craftsman gone? When did the world of masonry switch form pride in ones work to slamming in as many brick as you can just to make a buck?

While it is sad to see that few masons are willing to go the extra mile, it is more depressing to see that many of Detroit’s masonry gems are left to die a festering death. How can we let our brick gems literally fall to pieces? The few pitiful repairs that most of these homes receive seem have are haphazardly thrown together with little thought to appearance, quality, curb appeal, or of the homes value. I hope that those people doing the awful repairs are not being paid and that the sight of this work inspires the neighbors to hire a professional. Is saving a buck on a shoddy repair worth costing you a fortune in your home’s value? I am a big do –it-yourselfer, but I know my limitations. When I need a pro, I call one. As a brick layer in Michigan, it makes me sad to see some of the garbage people try to pass of as a repair. Let’s revitalize Detroit ONE BRICK AT A TIME!

To find A Masonry Restoration specialist
http:/michiganchimneyrepair.com


Looking for a Bricklayer in Michigan? Call (248) 895-7752 Specialized in masonry restoration and chimney repair. Our bricklayers can help you with any masonry project.

Our services include tuckpointing, brick, block, stone replacement, new construction, chimney replacement, chimney repair, porch repair,chimney cap and crown replacement.

We are happy to serve the following areas in Mi. Detroit, Ferndale, Farmington, Highland park, Hamtramck, Farmington Hills, Bloomfield, west Bloomfield, Oak park, Southfield, Huntington Woods, Berkley, Orchard lake, Walled lake, Milford, Commerce, South Lyon, New Hudson,
Warren, Rochester Hills, Rochester, Auburn Hills, Oakland County, Wayne County


Michigan Chimney Repair, Masonry Construction, Fireplace Construction, and Masonry Contractor. Brick Repair LLC is happy to serve the following communities: Auburn Hills, Beverly Hills, Birmingham, Bloomfield Hills, Bloomfield township, Brighton, Canton, Clarkston, Clawson, Commerce, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights, Ferndale, Drayton Plains, Eastpointe, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Grosse pointe, Highland, Highland Park, Howell, Hunington Woods, Keego Harbor, Lake Orion, Lathrup Village, Lincoln Park, Livonia, Madison Heights, Milford, New Hudson, Northville, Novi, Oak Park, Orchard Lake, Orion, Orchard Lake, Ortonville, Pontiac, Redford, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Romulus, Roseville, Royal Oak, South Lyon, Southfield, Sterling Heights, Sylvan Lake, Troy, Utica, Walled Lake, Waterford, West Bloomfield, White Lake Oakland County, Wayne County, Macomb County, Livingston County Michigan Chimney repair










Contact Us at Brickrepairllc@gmail.com


Brick Repair llc (248) 895-7752

masonry restoration and chimney repair. We are experts at matching brick and mortar color We offer free estimates for any of the following Services Chimney repair, Chimney construction, Chimney crown repair, chimney cap replacement, Chimney rebuilds, Chimineas Tuckpointing, Natural stone, Limestone replacement, Cultured stone, Brick porch repair, Brick porch construction, Brick wall construction, toothing work, pointing and repointing work, grout replacement, and historic restoration. We look forward to the opportunity to help you with and brick, block or stone project.

Auburn Hills, Beverly Hills, Birmingham, Bloomfield Hills, Bloomfield township, Brighton, Canton, Clarkston, Clawson, Commerce, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights, Ferndale, Drayton Plains, Eastpointe, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Grosse pointe, Highland, Highland Park, Howell, Hunington Woods, Keego Harbor, Lake Orion, Lathrup Village, Lincoln Park, Livonia, Madison Heights, Milford, New Hudson, Northville, Novi, Oak Park, Orchard Lake, Orion, Orchard Lake, Ortonville, Pontiac, Redford, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Romulus, Roseville, Royal Oak, South Lyon, Southfield, Sterling Heights, Sylvan Lake, Troy, Utica, Walled Lake, Waterford, West Bloomfield, White Lake Oakland County, Wayne County, Macomb County, Livingston County


Be sure to include your contact information in the body of your email. We welcome all feedback, suggestions, and questions.

Thank you.


Brick Repair, LLC.

248-895-7752




Brickrepairllc@gmail.com







Livonia Chimney Repair, Masonry Contractor, Fireplace Repair & Construction



Brick Repair LLC (248) 895-7752 is the #1 Chimney repair and masonry construction contractor in Livonia Michigan. Brick Repair LLC's masonry repair and chimney restoration contractors have been serving Livonia for over 12 years. Many Livonia Homes are in need of chimney repair and masonry maintenance Livonia is full of beautiful brick homes that are 30 to 50 years old and that is typically the age in which a brick are in need of a little TLC. When we build a brick chimney or masonry wall in Livonia we don't cut any corners, we just build them



Masonry construction is one the oldest forms of building in the world. As long as people have been building homes They have been built in stone & brick. Masonry is a trade of skilled craftsman. Chimney repair and custom masonry construction is not a work for the local handyman. Skilled Masonry Contractors have spent years developing the proper skill level in their trade. When Masonry fireplace or stone and brick chimney is built well, it can go decades with no need of masonry repair at all.



At Brick Repair LLC all of our stone and brick chimney repairs are done by Masonry craftsman to ensure that they will stand the test of time. When you live and work in Livonia Michigan the thought of looking at a sub par chimney repair every time you drive down haggerty is revolting. That is why all our masonry contractors take the proper time and use the best materials available in Michigan when we work on our customers homes.



When our bricklayers build you a brick mailbox, stone fireplace or repair an existing chimney in Livonia Michigan we treat that stone or brick construction project like it was being done at our own house. We are dedicated to the trade. We leave every one of our Livonia customers satisfied and willing to recommend us to a friend or a neighbor . We believe we are building more than just chimneys; we building relationships with our customers..



Brick Repair LLC’s Brick and masonry services include:Chimney Repair, Tuckpointing, Brick Fireplace Construction, Chimney damper installation, Masonry wall construction, Stone and Brick BBQ Construction, Chimney cap installation, Concrete, Concrete sidewalks,Chimney Crown Replacement. Natural Stone Installation, Limestone installation



If you are in need of stone, or brick chimney repair and would like a masonry fireplace out of brick block or stone,Brick Repair LLC services the following areas Brighton, Canton, Clarkston, ,Highland, Linden, Howell, Eastpointe, Farmington, West Bloomfield, Orchard Lake, Clawson, Bloomfield Hills, Commerce, Dearborn Heights, Drayton Plains, Linden, Dearborn, Southfield, Oak Park, Bloomfield Township, South Lyon, Sterling Heights Lake Orion, Roseville, Drayton Plains, Royal Oak, Farmington Hills, Grosse Pointe, Beverly Hills, Birmingham, Redford, Highland Park, Lathrup Village, Davison, White Lake, Holly, Lincoln Park,Ortonville, Pontiac,Oakland County, Auburn Hills, Ferndale, Sylvan Lake, Troy, Rochster Hills, Romulus, Livonia, Madison Heights, Fenton, Milford, Hunington Woods, Keego Harbor, New Hudson, Northville, Grand Blanc, Orchard Lake, Orion, Rochester, Sterling Heights,, Utica, Walled Lake, Detroit, Waterford, Oakland County, Wayne County, Macomb County, and Livingston County.




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Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Brick Repair (248) 895 7752


With any chimney repair or masonry restoration project comes debris. Small chunks of mortar, pieces of concrete, and chunks of brick from the demolition of the brickwork can add up fast. And lets face it, its not like your local garbageman or trash removal service is going to grab a garbage can that weighs 500 lbs and carry it away. That is why whenever you plan on doing any kind of demolition project, chimney repair, or brickwork you need to know what to do with your debris and trash.


One option is to remove the brick debris, concrete, and mortar yourself. This involves filling up a trailer or truck and hauling out the brick, concrete, and mortar. You can then haul this material to the dump, but the dump charges by weight. A much more practical method of removing the debris, is to find a local concrete recycling company. Most concrete recycling companies will take any concrete and mortar you have and dispose of it. A select few concrete recycling companies, commonly referred to as the concrete crusher, will take your brick debris also. Concrete, brick, and mortar are ground up to a gravel sized consistency. This aggregate is then recycled into new concrete. The problem with using concrete crushers and recyclers is unless you have a dump truck or dump trailer, you must handle your material and debris not only when you haul it off of the job, but when you dump it. By far the most cost-effective way to go on any large scale demolition project is to rent a dumpster. Whenever you rent the dumpster be sure to specify what you plan on disposing of inside of it.


At Brick Repair LLC we are committed to the local Michigan environment. We use concrete recycling companies whenever possible. For more information about masonry and masonry repair, our free how-to repair brick videos, please visit us http://www.chimneyrepairmichigan.com/ Brick repair llc's chimney repair service provides chimney cleaning for south east Residents of Rochester hills vist http://www.chimneyrepairrochesterhills.com/

For information about Michigan chimney sweeps chimney cleaning chimney repair

check out our masonry repair videos HTTP://www.michiganchimneyrepair.org/

Chimney repair in and Oakland county and surrounding cities http://www.chimneyrepairoaklandcounty.com/

Saturday, December 25, 2010


Fireplace mantel



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Jump to: navigation, search

Chimneypiece and overmantel, about 1750 V&A Museum no. 738:1 to 3-1897

Fireplace mantel or mantelpiece, also known as a chimneypiece, originated in medieval times as a hood that projected over a grate to catch the smoke. The term has evolved to include the decorative framework around the fireplace, and can include elaborate designs extending to the ceiling. Mantelpiece is now the general term for the jambs, mantel shelf, and external accessories of a fireplace. For many centuries, the chimneypiece was the most ornamental and most artistic feature of a room, but as fireplaces have become smaller, and modern methods of heating have been introduced, its artistic as well as its practical significance has lessened.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Fireplace mantels

In the early Renaissance style, the chimneypiece of the Palais de Justice at Bruges is a magnificent example; the upper portion, carved in oak, extends the whole width of the room, with nearly life-size statues of Charles V. and others of the royal family of Spain. The most prolific modern designer of chimneypieces was G. B. Piranesi, who in 1765 published a large series, on which at a later date the Empire style in France was based. In France, the finest work of the early Renaissance period is to be found in the chimneypieces, which are of infinite variety of design.

The English chimneypieces of the early seventeenth century, when the purer Italian style was introduced by Inigo Jones, were extremely simple in design, sometimes consisting only of the ordinary mantel piece, with classic architraves and shelf, the upper part of the chimney breast being paneled like the rest of the room. In the latter part of the century the classic architrave was abandoned in favor of a much bolder and more effective molding, as in the chimneypieces at Hampton Court, and the shelf was omitted.

In the eighteenth century, the architects returned to the Inigo Jones classic type, but influenced by the French work of Louis XIV. and XV. Figure sculpture, generally represented by graceful figures on each side, which assisted to carry the shelf, was introduced, and the over-mantel developed into an elaborate frame for the family portrait over the chimneypiece. Towards the close of the eighteenth century the designs of the Adam Brothers superseded all others, and a century later they came again into fashion. The Adam mantels are in wood enriched with ornament, cast in molds, sometimes copied from the carved wood decoration of old times.

Modern wooden fireplace mantel in a suburban American home.

Mantels or fireplace mantels can be the focus of custom interior decoration. A mantel traditionally offers a unique opportunity for the architect/designer to create a personal statement unique to the room they are creating. Historically the mantel defines the architectural style of the interior decor, whether it be traditional i.e. Classic, Renaissance, Italian, French, American, Victorian, Gothic etc.

The choice of material for the mantel includes such rich materials as marble, limestone, granite, or fine woods. Certainly the most luxurious of materials is marble. In the past only the finest of rare colored and white marbles were used. Today many of those fine materials are no longer available, however many other beautiful materials can be found world wide. The defining element of a great mantel is the design and workmanship.

A mantel offers a unique opportunity in its design for a sculptor/artisan to demonstrate their skill in carving each of the fine decorative elements. Elements such as capitals, moldings, brackets, figures, animals, fruits and vegetation are commonly used to decorate a mantel. One might say that a mantel can be an encyclopedia of sculpture. More than the material, it is the quality of the carving that defines the quality of the mantel piece thus highlighting the magnificence of the room.

In 1834 Gideon Algernon Mantell (1790 - 1852), was given a sandstone block containing Iguanodon bones. This was nicknamed the 'Mantell-Piece'.

[edit] History of fireplace mantels

Up to the twelfth century, fires were simply made in the middle of a home by a hypocaust, or with braziers, or by fires on the hearth with smoke vented out the lantern in the roof. As time went on, the placement of fireplaces moved to the wall, incorporating chimneys to vent the smoke. This permitted the design of a very elaborate, rich, architectural focal point for a grand room.

The earliest known chimneypiece is in the Kings House at Southampton, with Norman shafts in the joints carrying a segmental arch, which is attributed to the first half of the twelfth century. At a later date, in consequence of the greater width of the fireplace, flat or segmental arches were thrown across and constructed with archivolt, sometimes joggled, with the thrust of the arch being resisted by bars of iron at the back.

In domestic work of the fourteenth century, the chimneypiece was greatly increased in order to allow of the members of the family sitting on either side of the fire on the hearth, and in these cases great beams of timber were employed to carry the hood; in such cases the fireplace was so deeply recessed as to become externally an important architectural feature, as at Haddon Hall. The largest chimneypiece existing is in the great hall of the Palais des Comtes at Poitiers, which is nearly 30 feet (9.1 m) wide, having two intermediate supports to carry the hood; the stone flues are carried up between the tracery of an immense window above.

The history of carved mantels is a fundamental element in the history of western art. Every element of European sculpture can be seen on great mantels. Many of the historically noted sculptors of the past i.e. Augustus St. Gaudens designed and carved magnificent mantels, some of which can be found on display in the worlds great museums. Exactly as the facade of a building is distinguished by its design, proportion, and detail so it is with fine mantels. The attention to carved detail is what defines a great mantel.

[edit] Fireplace mantels today

Up until the 20th century and the invention of mechanized contained heating systems, rooms were heated by an open or central fire. A modern fireplace usually serves as an element to enhance the grandeur of an interior space rather than as a heat source. Today, fireplaces of varying quality, materials and style are available worldwide. The fireplace mantels of today often incorporate the architecture of two or more periods or cultures.



Bricklayer



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For the 1976 Mexican film, see The Bricklayers.

The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view of the subject. Please improve this article and discuss the issue on the talk page. (December 2010)

Bricklayer in Paoua, Central African Republic

A bricklayer or mason is a craftsman who lays bricks to construct brickwork. The term also refers to personnel who use blocks to construct blockwork walls and other forms of masonry.[1] In British and Australian English, a bricklayer is colloquially known as a "brickie".

The training of a trade in European cultures has been a formal tradition for many centuries. A craftsman typically begins in an apprenticeship, working for and learning from a master craftsman, and after a number of years is released from his master's service to become a journeyman. After a journeyman has proven himself to his trade's guild (most guilds are now known by different names), he may settle down as a master craftsman and work for himself, eventually taking on his own apprentices.

A notable person who laid bricks (as a hobby) was Sir Winston Churchill.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Bricklayers in the UK

The modern process can be different. A craftsman still begins as an apprentice, but the apprenticeship is carried out partly through working for a qualified craftsman and partly through an accredited technical college delivering level one, two and three brickwork qualifications to learners (in the UK). These come in a variety of forms; City and Guilds, Foundation, Intermediate and Advanced Construction Awards and site-based NVQ Levels one to three. After about two years college, the learner/worker is ready for site as an improver having attained level two, and works under guidance until he or she is well-rounded in the craft. From start to finish it takes at least four years, and even then there is still more to be learned; modern construction methods are always developing, and a typical brickie will be expected to turn his or her hand to allied trades. Fully qualified doesn't mean expert, which is why employment ads often state 'must have ten years experience in the trade' - a longer learning curve than a junior doctor.

[edit] Bricklayers in Germany

The German word for a bricklayer is Maurer. In Germany bricklaying is one of the most traditional trades.

[edit] Career

The aspirant bricklayers start their careers as apprentices (Lehrlinge) and learn from a master craftsmen (Meister) the skills necessary for the trade. They also attend a vocational school (Berufsschule) to gain theoretical knowledge.

After three years of training they graduate by successfully completing an exam held by the guild (Innung). The apprentices must show that they are able to construct masonry, know how to protect a house from humidity or water ingress, know about thermal insulation, know about the science of construction material and about occupational health and safety. If the apprentices are successful they are awarded with the journeymans's certificate (Gesellenbrief) and are now allowed to call themselves journeyman (Geselle).

After graduation the journeymen may choose to go on a three years and one day journey known as the "journey years" (Wanderjahre, Walz, Stör, Tippelei). For this purpose he may join an association for journeymen (Schacht). The most important journeymen associations are as follows:

1. The righteous journeymen (Rechtschaffene Fremde)

The members of this association wear traditionally black (aka the blacks) to express their decency (Ehrbarkeit). The association is more than 200 years old. The members have a secret ceremonial which they are not allowed to describe, but people say that its content and language are of great beauty. This association is very near to the Unions and many of its members are members of the unions as well.

2. The free journeymen (Fremder Freiheitsschacht)

This association was founded on Mayday of 1910 by the famous bricklayer Hermann Schäfer. They wear red and are called the reds. Their maxim is "we all are brothers, we all are the same" ("Wir alle seins Brüder, wir alle seins gleich" dialect). They call each other "Dear Brother" (Bruderherz).

3. Association of Roland (Rolandschacht)

They wear blue and are called the blue ones. Their maxim is "loyalty and friendship and brotherhood will unite us brothers of Roland all the time" ("Treue, Freundschaft, Brüderlichkeit, vereint uns Rolandsbrüder alle Zeit" )

After their journey years the craftsmen are allowed to settle down ( to become a local/citizen (Einheimischer)), but the will only be allowed to do so, if they behaved respectably on their journey.

A person who has had many years of experience in their trade will be allowed to become a master. They will have an exam again. In this exam they will show that they are an expert of the trade. They also must show that the can work well with other people and have some teaching skills, because as a master he will be allowed to educate younger bricklayers.

If he did well in the exam he will be rewarded with the master craftmen's diploma (Meisterbrief) by the chamber of crafts.

As a master he will be allowed to start his own construction company.



Brickwork



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Dismantled wall showing brickwork

Decorative Tudor brick chimneys, Hampton Court Palace UK

Herringbone patern brickwork, medieval Canterbury UK

12th century temple brickwork, Ayuthaya Thailand

Brickwork is masonry produced by a bricklayer, using bricks and mortar to build up brick structures such as walls. Brickwork is also used to finish corners, door and window openings etc. in buildings made of other materials.

Where the bricks are to remain fully visible, as opposed to being covered up by plaster or stucco, this is known as face-work or facing brickwork.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Brick dimensions

A wall built in Flemish bond

Brick sizes are generally coordinated so that two rows of bricks laid alongside, with a mortar joint between them, are the same width as the length of a single brick laid across the two rows. That allows headers, bricks laid at 90 degrees to the direction of the wall, to be built in and tie together two or more layers, or wythes, of brick. The thickness of a brick wall is measured by the length of a brick, so a wall one brick thick will contain two layers of brick, one and a half bricks is three layers etc. A common metric coordinating size is 215 millimetres (8.5 in) x 102.5 millimetres (4.04 in) x 65 millimetres (2.6 in), which is intended to work with a 10 millimetres (0.39 in) mortar joint: 75 millimetres (3.0 in) course height, 215 millimetres (8.5 in) wall thickness etc. This is based on the earlier inch sizes. There are many different standard brick sizes worldwide, most with some coordinating principle.

[edit] Wall thickness and construction

[edit] Solid brickwork

The simplest type of wall is constructed in solid brickwork, normally at least one brick thick. Bricks are laid in rows known as courses, the arrangement of headers and stretchers in each course gives rise to different patterns or bonds.

[edit] Cavity walls

In a cavity wall, two layers (or leaves) of brickwork are tied together with metal ties, with a cavity or 2 to 4 inches that may be filled with insulation.

[edit] Brick facing

A non-structural outer facing of brick is tied back to an internal structure: a layer of blockwork, timber or metal studwork etc.

[edit] Terminology

Positions

  • Stretcher: a brick laid horizontally, flat with the long side of the brick exposed on the outer face of a wall.

  • Header: a brick laid flat with the short end of the brick exposed.

  • Soldier: a brick laid vertically with the narrow ("stretcher") side exposed.

  • Sailor: a brick laid vertically with the broad side exposed.

  • Rowlock: a brick laid on the long, narrow side with the small or "header" side exposed.

  • Shiner: a brick laid on the long narrow side with the broad side exposed [1] [2]

Six positions

Brick Types. There are two main types of clay bricks: pressed and wire cut. Pressed bricks usually have a deep frog in one bedding surface and a shallow frog in the other. Wire cut bricks usually have 3 or 4 holes through them constituting up to 25% of the total volume of the brick. Some ‘perforated’ bricks have many smaller holes.

Brick Usage. There are three main categories of use, and both pressed bricks or wire cut brick types are used in all three categories.

Facing brickwork is the visible decorative work.

Engineering brickwork, often seen in bridges and large industrial construction but may also be hidden in ground works where maximum durability is required e.g. manhole construction.

Common brickwork is not usually seen and is used where engineering qualities are not required; below ground in domestic buildings and internal walls for instance.

Frog up/down. A frog is a recessed part of a surface of a brick. Pressed bricks are laid ‘frog up’ when maximum strength is required especially in engineering work. This method also increases the mass of a wall and decreases sound transmittance. Pressed bricks may be laid frog down; this method is favoured by the bricklayer since less mortar is required for bedding. There may also be a marginal increase in thermal insulation due to the entrapped air pockets. A disadvantage of this method is that with bricks having a very deep ‘V’ shaped frog there may be some difficulty in making reliable fixings to the wall when the fixing hits an air pocket.

Wire cut bricks may be laid either way up but some types of wire cuts have a textured (combed) face creating folds in the face of the brick which is directional. It is advisable to lay these bricks with the folds hanging downwards to maximise the weathering characteristics of the brick.

Ties or cavity ties are used to tie layers of brickwork into one another, to form a structural whole. A common type is a figure-eight of twisted wire, generally stainless steel to avoid failure due to corrosion. The loop at either end is buried in the mortar bed as the wall is built up.

Mortar is a mixture of sand, lime and Portland cement, mixed with water to a workable consistency. It is applied with a bricklayer's trowel, and sets solid in a few hours. There are many different mixes and admixtures used to make mortars with different performance characteristics.

[edit] British Bricklaying Terms

Bat - a cut brick. A quarter bat is one quarter the length of a stretcher. A half bat is one half.[3]
Closer - a cut brick used to change the bond at quoins. Commonly a quarter bat.
Queens closer - a brick which has been cut over its length and is a stretcher long and a quarter bat deep. Commonly used to bond one brick walls at right angled quoins.
Kings closer - a brick which has been cut diagonally over its length to show a half bat at one end and nothing at the other.
Snapped Header - a half bat laid to appear as a header. Commonly used to build short radii half brick walls or decorative features.
Squint - a brick which is specially made to bond around external quoins of obtuse angles. Typically 60 or 45 degrees.
Dog Leg - a brick which is specially made to bond around internal acute angles. Typically 60 or 45 degrees.
Corbel - a brick, block or stone which oversails the main wall.
Cant - a header which is angled at less than 90 degrees.
Plinth - a stretcher which is angled at less than 90 degrees.
Voussoir - a supporting brick in an arch, usually shaped to ensure the joints appear even.
Creasing tile - a flat clay tile laid as a brick to form decorative features or waterproofing to the top of a garden wall.
Cramp - or frame cramp is a tie used to secure a window or door frame.
Movement Joint - a straight joint formed in a wall to contain compressible material, in order to prevent cracking as the wall contracts or expands.
Air brick - a brick with perforations to allow the passage of air through a wall. Usually used to permit the ventilation of underfloor areas.
Pier - a free standing section of masonry such as pillar or panel.
Quoin - a corner in masonry.
Stopped end - the end of a wall which does not abut any other component.
Dog tooth - a course of headers where alternate bricks project from the face.
Saw tooth - a course of headers laid at a 45 degree angle to the main face.
Sleeper wall - a low wall whose function is to provide support, typically to floor joists.
Honeycomb wall - a wall, usually stretcher bond, in which the vertical joints are opened up to the size of a quarter bat to allow air to circulate. Commonly used in sleeper walls.
Party Wall - a wall shared by two properties or parties.
Shear Wall - a wall designed to give way in the event of structural failure in order to preserve the integrity of the remaining building.
Fire Wall - a wall specifically constructed to compartmentalise a building in order to prevent fire spread.
Withe - the central wall dividing two shafts. Most commonly to divide flues within a chimney.
Toothing - the forming of a temporary stopped end in such a way as to allow the bond to continue at a later date as the work proceeds.
Indent - a hole left in a wall in order to accommodate an adjoining wall at a future date. These are often left to permit temporary access to the work area.
Tumbling in - bonding a battered buttress or breast into a horizontal wall.
Racking back - stepping back the bond as the wall increases in height in order to allow the work to proceed at a future date.

[edit] Brickwork bonds

Flemish bond.

Cavity wall-stretcher bond

English bond

[edit] Flemish bond

Ruins of Rosewell Plantation, Gloucester County, Virginia, one of earliest works in America in Flemish bond. The bricks were imported from England.

Flemish bond, also known as Dutch bond, has historically always been considered the most decorative bond, and for this reason was used extensively for dwellings until the adoption of the cavity wall. It is created by alternately laying headers and stretchers in a single course. The next course is laid so that a header lies in the middle of the stretcher in the course below. This bond is two bricks thick. It is quite difficult to lay Flemish bond properly, since for best effect all the perpendiculars (vertical mortar joints) need to be vertically aligned. If only one face of a Flemish bond wall is exposed, one third of the bricks are not visible, and hence may be of low visual quality. This is a better ratio than for English bond, Flemish bond's main rival for load-bearing walls.

A common variation often found in early 18th century buildings is Glazed-headed Flemish Bond, in which the exposed headers are burned until they vitrify with a black glassy surface. Monk bond' is a variant of Flemish bond, with two stretchers between the headers in each row, and the headers centred over the join between the two stretchers in the row below. A common variant is Wessex Bond with three stretchers between each header. This is easier to lay than full Flemish Bond and produces a less intense, but nevertheless "pretty" brickwork face.

[edit] Stretcher bond

Stretcher bond, also known as running bond, consists of bricks laid with only their long narrow sides (their stretchers) showing, overlapping midway with the courses of bricks below and above. It is the simplest repeating pattern, but since it doesn't bond with other layers of bricks it is suitable only for a wall one brick thick, the thinnest possible wall.[4] Such a thin wall is not stable enough to stand alone, and must be tied to a supporting structure. It is common in modern buildings, particularly as the outer face of a cavity wall, or as the facing to a timber or steel framed structure.

[edit] English bond

This bond has two alternating courses of stretchers and headers, with the headers centered on the stretchers, and each alternate row vertically aligned. There is a variant in which the second course of stretchers is half offset from the first, giving rise to English cross bond or Dutch bond.[5]

[edit] American bond

By one definition, Common, American or Scottish bond has one row of headers to five of stretchers.[6] The number of stretcher courses may vary from that, in practice. For example, the brick Clarke-Palmore House in Henrico County, Virginia, has a lower level built in 1819 described as being American bond of 3 to 5 stretcher courses between each header course, and an upper level built in 1855 with American bond of 6 to 7 stretcher courses between each header course.[7]

[edit] Garden wall bonds

English garden wall bond - A repeating sequence of three courses of stretchers followed by a course of headers.
Flemish garden Wall Bond - A repeating sequence of three stretchers followed by a header in each course. The courses are offset so that the headers of the courses above and below is centered on the middle stretcher of the course between (so at any header the sequence vertically is header-stretcher-header etc.). A variation of Flemish Garden Wall bond is Flemish diagonal bond - A complex pattern of stretcher courses alternating with courses of one or two stretchers between headers, at various offsets such that over ten courses a diamond shaped pattern appears.[5]
Water Bond - a nine inch wall bond where both skins are built in stretcher bond, but the bed joints in are staggered so as not to align. This bond is often specified by local councils in the North of England for manholes.

[edit] Rat-trap bond

Rat-trap bond, also known as Chinese bond, is a type of garden wall bond similar to Flemish, but consisting of rowlocks and shiners instead of headers and stretchers (the stretchers and headers are laid on their sides, with the base of the stretcher facing outwards). This gives a wall with an internal cavity bridged by the headers, hence the name. The main advantage of this bond is economy in use of bricks, giving a wall of one brick thickness with fewer bricks than a solid bond. Rat-trap bond was in common usage in England for building houses of fewer than 3 stories up to the turn of the 20th century and is today still used in India as an economical bond, as well for the insulation properties offered by the air cavity. Also, many brick walls surrounding kitchen gardens were designed with cavities so hot air could circulate in the winter, warming fruit trees or other produce spread against the walls, causing them to bloom earlier and forcing early fruit production.[8][9]

[edit] See also



Stone ender



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See also: List of the oldest buildings in Rhode Island

1653 Roger Mowry House (Providence) diagram from Norman Isham's 1895 book [1]

Arnold House, 1691, Lincoln, Rhode Island

The Stone-ender is a unique style of Rhode Island architecture that developed in the 17th century where one wall in a house is made up of a large stone chimney.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] History

Rhode Island was first settled in 1636 by Roger Williams and other colonists from England. Many of the colonists came from western England and brought the prevalent British architectural ideas with them to New England but adapted these to the environment of Rhode Island. The colonists built “stone enders” which made use of the material that was in abundance in the area, timber and stone. Rhode Island also had an abundance of limestone (in contrast to the other New England states), and this allowed Rhode Islanders to make mortar to build massive end chimneys on their houses. Much of the lime was quarried at Limerock in Lincoln, Rhode Island. Only a few stone enders remain in the 21st century. Architectural restorationist, Norman Isham restored several original stone enders in the early 20th century, (see: *Clement Weaver House and Clemence-Irons House). Armand LaMontagne, a Scituate sculptor, handbuilt a large 17th-century style stone-ender off of Route 6 in Scituate, Rhode Island in the 1970s.

[edit] Description of a Stone-ender

Stone ender houses were usually timber-framed, one and one-half or two stories in height, with one room on each floor. One end of the house contained a massive stone chimney, which usually filled the entire end wall, thus giving the dwelling the name of “stone ender.” Robert O. Jones, in the Statewide Historical Preservation Report K-W-1, Warwick, Rhode Island, in 1981, noted that the windows were very small “casements filled with oiled paper” and that “the stairs to the upper chambers were steep, ladder-like structures usually squeezed in between the chimney and the front entrance.” He points out that a few houses may have had leaded glass windows, but that was very rare. For an example containing the leaded glass windows along with ladder-like, steep stairs, see: *Clement Weaver House, East Greenwich, Rhode Island 1679

[edit] List of early extant Rhode Island stone-enders (2010)

[edit] Images

Epenetus Olney House in North Providence, demolished by 1900

Arthur Fenner House (ca. 1655) in Cranston, demolished 1886

Clement Weaver House, ca. 1679, in East Greenwich, Rhode Island

Valentine Whitman House, 1694, Lincoln, Rhode Island

Irons House, 1691, Johnston, Rhode Island

Tripp House, 1720, Washington Street, Newport, Rhode Island

John Bliss House, ca. 1680, 2 Wilbur Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island

Mowry Tavern, ca. 1650, in Providence near North Burial Ground (demolished c.1900)

John Mowry, Jr. or Sayles House on Wesquadomeset (Sayles) Hill near Iron Mine Hill and Sayles Hill Roads in North Smithfield, demolished in the early 20th century

Stone ender on Memorial Boulevard in Newport, Rhode Island

Thomas Fenner House in Cranston, Rhode Island

Edward Searle House in Cranston, Rhode Island

Armand Lamontagne's stone ender from the late 20th century in Scituate, Rhode Island

Smith-Appleby House in Smithfield with a modified chimney

Governor William Coddington House, a stone ender in Newport built in 1640-41, was destroyed in 1835




List of tallest chimneys in the world



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Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2010)

A list of the tallest chimneys of the world.

[edit] Timeline of world's tallest chimney

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, tall chimneys were built, at the beginning with bricks, and later also of concrete or steel. Although chimneys never held the absolute height record, they are among the tallest free-standing architectural structures and often hold national records (as tallest free-standing or as overall tallest structure of a country).[citation needed]

Held record

Name and Location

Constructed

Height (m)

Height (ft)

Notes

From

To

1842

1859

Tennant's Stalk, Glasgow, Scotland, UK

1842

132

435


1859

1889

Port Dundas Townsend Chimney, Glasgow, Scotland, UK

1859

138.4

454


1889

1919

Halsbrücker Esse, Halsbrücke, Germany

1889

140

459


1919

Anaconda Smelter Stack, Anaconda, Montana, USA

1919

178.3

585

Tallest chimney built of bricks

1962

1967

Chimney of Schilling Power Station, Stade, Germany

1962

220

722


1967

1970

Chimney of Lippendorf Power Station, Lippendorf, Germany

1967

300

984


1970

1971

Chimney of Cumberland Power Plant, Cumberland City, USA

1970

305

1001


1971

1987

Inco Superstack, Copper Cliff, Ontario, Canada

1971

380

1247


1987

GRES-2 Power Station, Ekibastusz, Kazakhstan

1987

419.7

1377


[edit] Current

Name

Pinnacle height

Year

Country

Town

Remarks

Chimney of GRES-2 Power Station

1377 ft

419.7 m

1987

Kazakhstan

Ekibastuz

Tallest chimney in the world

Inco Superstack

1247 ft

380 m

1971

Canada

Sudbury, Ontario

Tallest chimney in the Western Hemisphere

Chimney of Homer City Generating Station

1217 ft

371 m

1977

United States

Homer City, Pennsylvania

Tallest chimney in the United States.

Kennecott Smokestack

1215 ft

370.4 m

1974

United States

Magna, Utah

Tallest free-standing structure west of the Mississippi River

Chimney of Berezovskaya GRES

1214 ft

370 m

1985

Russia

Sharypovo

Tallest chimney in Russia

Chimney of Mitchell Power Plant

1206 ft

367.6 m

1971

United States

Moundsville, West Virginia


Trbovlje Chimney

1181 ft

360 m

1976

Slovenia

Trbovlje

Tallest chimney in Europe

Endesa Termic

1168 ft

356 m

1974

Spain

As Pontes, Galicia


Chimney of Phoenix Copper Smelter

1153 ft

351.5 m

1995

Romania

Baia Mare


Chimney of Syrdarya Power Plant

1148 ft

350 m

1975

Uzbekistan

Syr Darya


Chimney of Teruel Power Plant

1125 ft

343 m


Spain

Teruel


Chimney of Plomin Power Station

1115 ft

340 m


Croatia

Plomin


Chimney of Power Station Westerholt

1106 ft

337 m

1997

Germany

Gelsenkirchen, North Rhine-Westphalia

Demolished on December 3, 2006 by explosives. Tallest free-standing structure ever demolished by explosives in a controlled manner

Chimney of Mountaineer Power Plant

1102 ft

336 m

1980

United States

New Haven, West Virginia


Chimney of Moldavskaya GRES-5

1099 ft

335 m


Template:Moldova

Nezavertailovca[1]


Chimney of Ekibastuz GRES-1

1083 ft

330 m


Kazakhstan

Ekibastuz[1]


2 Сhimneys of Permskaya GRES

1083 ft

330 m

1987

Russia

Dobryanka


2 Сhimneys of Reftinskaya GRES

1083 ft

330 m

1980

Russia

Reftinskiy


Chimney of Kharkiv TEC-5

1083 ft

330 m

1981

Ukraine

Kharkiv


Chimney of Zuevska thermal power station

1083 ft

330 m


Ukraine

Zuhres, Donetsk Oblast[1]


Chimney of Maritza East Power Station

1066 ft

325 m

1977/1980

Bulgaria

Stara Zagora


Chimney of Pirdop copper smelter and refinery

1066 ft

325 m

?

Bulgaria

Pirdop


2 Сhimneys of Kirishskaya GRES

1050 ft

320 m

1984/1986

Russia

Kirishi[1]


Chimney of Ryazanskaya GRES

1050 ft

320 m

1973

Russia

Novomichurinsk


2 Сhimneys of Tobolsk TEC

1050 ft

320 m

1983

Russia

Tobolsk


Chimney of Kostromskaya GRES

1050 ft

320 m

?

Russia

Volgorechensk


Chimney of Zaporozhskaya GRES

1050 ft

320 m

1972

Ukraine

Enerhodar[2]


Chimney of Vuhlehirska thermal power plant

1050 ft

320 m

197?

Ukraine

Solncedar


Chimney of Rockport Power Plant

1038 ft

316.4 m


United States

Rockport, Indiana


Chimney of Ugljevik Power Plant

1017 ft

310 m

1985

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Ugljevik


Chimney of Armstrong Power Plant

1011 ft

308.15 m

1982

United States

Kittanning


Chimney of Buschhaus Power Station

1007 ft

307 m

1984

Germany

Helmstedt, Lower Saxony


Chimney of Harrison Power Station Scrubber

1001 ft

305 m

1994

United States

Haywood, West Virginia


Chimney of Robert W Scherer Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1983/1985

United States

Juliette, Georgia


Chimney of Independence Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1983

United States

Newark, Arkansas


Chimney of Kyger Creek Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1980

United States

Gallipolis, Ohio


Chimney of White Bluff Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1980

United States

Pine Bluff, Arkansas


Chimney of Harllee Branch Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1978

United States

Milledgeville, Georgia


Chimney of Widows Creek Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1977

United States

Stevenson, Alabama


Chimney of Hal B. Wansley Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1976

United States

Carrollton, Georgia


Chimney of Kingston Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1976

United States

Kingston, Tennessee


Chimney of Harrison Power Station

1001 ft

305 m

1972/1973

United States

Haywood, West Virginia


Chimney of Cumberland Power Plant

1001 ft

305 m

1970

United States

Cumberland City, Tennessee


Chimney of W. H. Sammis Power Plant, Unit 7

1001 ft

305 m

1970

United States

Stratton, Ohio


Chimney of Conemaugh Generating Station

1001 ft

305 m


United States

Seward, Pennsylvania


Chimney of Hayden Smelter

1001 ft

305 m


United States

Hayden, Arizona


Chimney of Plant Bowen Coal

1001 ft

305 m


United States

Taylorsville, Georgia


Chimney of Chvaletice Power Station

1001 ft

305 m

1977

Czech Republic

Chvaletice


Chimney of Pleasants Power Plant

1000 ft

304.8 m


United States

Belmont, West Virginia

2 chimneys

Chimney of Power Plant Scholven

991 ft

302 m


Germany

Gelsenkirchen


Chimney of Power Plant Chemnitz

991 ft

302 m


Germany

Chemnitz


Chimney of SASOL III Synthetic Fuel Production Plant

988 ft

301 m

1979

South Africa

Secunda


Chimney of Lippendorf Power Station

984 ft

300 m

1967

Germany

Lippendorf, Saxony

Demolished in 2005

Chimney of Tušimice Power Station

984 ft

300 m

1974

Czech Republic

Tušimice


Chimney of Novaky Power Plant

984 ft

300 m

1976

Slovakia

Nováky


Chimney of Clifty Creek Power Plant

984 ft

300 m

1978

United States

Madison, Indiana


Chimney of Prunéřov Power Station

984 ft

300 m

1981

Czech Republic

Prunéřov


Chimney of Duvha Power Station

984 ft

300 m

1982

South Africa

Witbank


Chimney of Power Plant Jänschwalde

984 ft

300 m

1981

Germany

Jänschwalde


Chimney of Provence Power Station

984 ft

300 m

1984

France

Gardanne


Thermal power station Kakanj[3]

984 ft

300 m

1987

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Čatići


Chimney of Walsum Power Station

984 ft

300 m

1988

Germany

Walsum, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Herne Power Station

984 ft

300 m

1989

Germany

Herne, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Bishkek TEC

984 ft

300 m

1989

Kyrgyzstan

Bishkek


Chimney of Thierbach Power Station

984 ft

300 m


Germany

Espenhain, Saxony

Demolished

Chimneys of Boxberg Power Station

984 ft

300 m


Germany

Boxberg, Saxony


Chimneys of Marl-Chemiepark Power Station

984 ft

300 m


Germany

Marl, North Rhine-Westphalia

Dismantled

Chimney of Orot Rabin

984 ft

300 m

1997

Israel

Hadera


Chimney of Rybnik Power Station

984 ft

300 m

1974

Poland

Rybnik


Chimney of Jaworzno Power Station

984 ft

300 m


Poland

Jaworno


Chimney of Bełchatów Power Station

984 ft

300 m


Poland

Bełchatów


Chimney of Kozienice Power Station

984 ft

300 m


Poland

Kozienice


Chimney of Warszawa-Kawęczyn Power Station

984 ft

300 m


Poland

WarsawKawcyn


Chimney 1 of Compostilla II Power Station

951 ft

290 m


Spain

Cubillos del Sil


Chimney of Bruce Mansfield Power Plant, Unit 1 + 2

950 ft

289.6 m

1976

United States

Shippingport, Pennsylvania


Chimney of Bergkamen Power Station

925 ft

282 m

1981

Germany

Bergkamen, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Werdohl-Elverlingsen Power Station

925 ft

282 m


Germany

Werdohl, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Fundidora Mexicana de Cobre

919 ft

280 m

1988

Mexico

Nacozari


Chimney of Matla Power Station Smokestack

906 ft

276 m

1982

South Africa

Kriel

Destroyed

Chimney of John E. Amos Power Plant

904 ft

275.4 m

1971/1973

United States

St. Albans, West Virginia


Chimney of Dahanu Power Station

903 ft

275.3 m

1995

India

Dahanu

Tallest in India

Chimney of Sagardighi Thermal Power Station

902 ft

275 m

2004

India

Sagardighi, Murshidabad


Chimney of Korba Power Plant

902 ft

275 m

2009

India

Korba

.

Chimney of Ibbenbüren Power Station

902 ft

275 m

1985

Germany

Ibbenbüren, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of TEC-5

901 ft

275 m

1983

Russia

Omsk


Chimneys of Kendal Power Station

902 ft

275 m

1988/1991

South Africa

Kendal


Chimneys of Lethabo Power Station

902 ft

275 m

1985/1988

South Africa

Vereeniging


Chimneys of Tutuka Power Station

902 ft

275 m

1985/1988

South Africa

Standerton


Chimneys of Matla Power Station

902 ft

275 m

1984

South Africa

Kriel

One stack is a replacement. Original stack was demolished after partial collapse of internal structure during construction.

Chimney of Orhaneli Power Plant

902 ft

275 m


Turkey

Orhaneli


Chimney of Killen Generating Station

901 ft

274.5 m

1982

United States

Manchester, Ohio


Chimney of Kammer Power Plant

901 ft

274.5 m

1978

United States

Moundsville, West Virginia


Chimney of Power Plant Łódź

757 ft

274 m

1977

Poland

Łódź


Chimney of Cardinal Power Plant, Unit 3

899 ft

272.8 m

1977

United States

Brilliant, Ohio


Chimney of MIM Smelter (MIM Smelter Stack)

886 ft

270 m

1978

Australia

Mount Isa, Queensland


Chimney 2 of Compostilla II Power Station

886 ft

270 m


Spain

Cubillos del Sil


Chimney of Mělník Power Station

886 ft

270 m

1971

Czech Republic

Horní Počáply


Chimney of Stavropolskaya GRES

886 ft

270 m


Russia

Stavropol


Chimney of Kurganskaya TEC

886 ft

270 m


Russia

Kurgan


Chimney of TEC-6

886 ft

270 m

1983

Ukraine

Kiev


Chimney of Ashbridges Bay Sewage Treatment Plant

857 ft

261.2 m


Canada

Toronto, Ontario


Chimneys of Loy Yang Power Station

853 ft

260 m


Australia

Traraglon, Victoria


Chimney of Power Plant Siersza

853 ft

260 m

1970

Poland

Siersza


Chimney of Power Plant Kraków-Leg

853 ft

260 m


Poland

Kraków


Chimney of Power Plant Rybnik

853 ft

260 m


Poland

Rybnik


Chimney of Dětmarovice Power Station

850 ft

259 m

1975

Czech Republic

Dětmarovice


Chimney of Shawville Generating Station

850 ft

259 m

1976

United States

Erie, Pennsylvania


Chimney of R. E. Burger Power Plant

850 ft

259 m

1972

United States

Shadyside, Ohio


Chimneys of W. H. Sammis Power Plant, Unit 5 + 6

850 ft

259 m

1967

United States

Stratton, Ohio


Chimney of Drax Power Station

850 ft

259 m

1969

United Kingdom

Drax, North Yorkshire, England


Chimney of Robert W Scherer Power Plant New Units 3&4

847 ft

258 m

2010

United States

Juliette, Georgia


Chimney of TEC-4

846 ft

258 m


Russia

Omsk


Second chimney of Kostromskaya GRES

840 ft

256 m

2002

Russia

Volgorechensk


Chimney Hamburg-Port

840 ft

256 m


Germany

Hamburg

Demolished. At its demolition by explosives in April 2004 further damage occurred caused by miscalculation of debris trajectories.

Chimney of Loy Yang

837 ft

255 m

1993

Australia

Traraglon, Victoria


Chimney of Power Plant Moszna

830 ft

253 m


Poland

Moszna


Chimney of Gen. J. M. Gavin Power Plant

830 ft

253 m

1994

United States

Cheshire, Ohio


Chimneys of Yates Power Plant

830 ft

253 m

1974

United States

Newnan, Georgia


Chimney of El Paso Smelter

828 ft

252.5 m

1967

United States

El Paso, Texas


Chimney of HBM&S Flin Flon Smelter

825 ft

251 m

1973

Canada

Flin Flon, Manitoba


Chimney of Esbjerg Power Station

821 ft

250.24 m


Denmark

Esbjerg


Chimneys of Bayswater Power Station

820 ft

250 m


Australia

Hunter Valley


Mount Piper Chimney

820 ft

250 m


Australia

Lithgow


TE Rijeka

820 ft

250 m

1978

Croatia

Kostrena


Chimney of Wilhelmshaven Power Station

820 ft

250 m

1976

Germany

Wilhelmshaven, Lower Saxony


Chimney of Voerde Power Station

820 ft

250 m

1982

Germany

Voerde, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney Grosskrotzenburg Power Station

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Großkrotzenburg, Hesse


Chimney Lünen Power Station

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Lünen, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Unit 6 of Bremen-Hafen Power Station

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Bremen


Chimney of Altbach Power Station

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Altbach, Baden-Württemberg


Chimney of Heilbronn Power Station

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Heilbronn, Baden-Württemberg


Chimneys Duisburg-Schwelgern

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Duisburg, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney Duisburg-Neuenkamp

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Duisburg, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney Duisburg-Hochfeld

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Duisburg, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Mehrum Power Station

820 ft

250 m


Germany

Hohenhameln, Lower Saxony


Chimney of AES Tisza 2 Power Plant

820 ft

250 m

1974

Hungary

Tiszaújváros


Chimney 1 and Chimney 2 of Orot Rabin

820 ft

250 m

1993

Israel

Hadera


Chimneys of Porto Tolle Power Station

820 ft

250 m

1977

Italy

Porto Tolle


Chimney of Plant

820 ft

250 m

?

Kazakhstan

Temirtau


Chimneys of Elektrenai Power Plant

820 ft

250 m

1968

Lithuania

Elektrenai


Chimneys of Vilnius 3 Power Plant

820 ft

250 m


Lithuania

Vilnius


Chimney of Power Plant Polaniac

820 ft

250 m


Poland

Polaniac

2 chimneys

Chimney of Power Plant Katowice

820 ft

250 m


Poland

Opole


Chimney of Power Plant Opole

820 ft

250 m


Poland

Katowice


Chimney of artificial fibre factory "WISKORD"

820 ft

250 m


Poland

Szczecin


Chimney of Stavropolskaya GRES

820 ft

250 m


Russia

Stavropol


2 Chimneys of Reftinskaya GRES

820 ft

250 m

1975

Russia

Reftinskiy


Chimney of TEC-2

820 ft

250 m

1986

Russia

Tyumen


2 Chimneys of TEC-23

820 ft

250 m

1975/1981

Russia

Moscow


Chimney of TEC-27

820 ft

250 m

1994

Russia

Moscow


Chimney of TEC-2

820 ft

250 m


Russia

Lipetsk


Chimney of TEC-2

820 ft

250 m


Russia

Ulyanovsk


Chimney of Kashirskaya GRES

820 ft

250 m


Russia

Kashira


Chimney of Troitskaya TEC

820 ft

250 m


Russia

Troitsk, Chelyabinsk Oblast


Chimneys of Majuba Power Station

820 ft

250 m

1996/2000

South Africa

Volksrust


Chimneys of Matimba Power Station

820 ft

250 m

1987/1990

South Africa

Ellisras


Chimneys of Taichung Power Plant

820 ft

250 m


Taiwan

Taichung


Chimney of ASARCO Cooper Plant

814 ft

248 m

1967

United States

El Paso, Texas


Chimney of Yates Power Plant

805 ft

245.4 m

1971/1973

United States

Newnan, Georgia


Chimneys of Monroe Power Plant

801 ft

244.1 m

1974

United States

Monroe, Michigan


Chimney of Grain Power Station

801 ft

244 m

1979

United Kingdom

Isle of Grain, England


Chimney of Shawnee Power Plant

801 ft

244 m

1979/1980

United States

Paducah, Kentucky


Chimneys of Miami Fort Power Plant

801 ft

244 m

1975/1978

United States

North Bend, Ohio


Chimneys of J M Stuart Generating Station

801 ft

244 m

1970/1971/1972/1974

United States

Aberdeen, Ohio


Chimney of Paradise Power Plant

801 ft

244 m

1970

United States

Drakesboro, Kentucky


Chimneys of Homer City Generating Station, Unit 1 + 2

801 ft

244 m

1969

United States

Homer City, Pennsylvania


Chimneys of Keystone Generating Station, Unit 1 + 2

801 ft

244 m

1967/68

United States

Shelocta, Pennsylvania


Chimney of Bull Run Power Plant

801 ft

244 m

1967

United States

Oak Ridge, Tennessee


Associated Electric Stack#1

800 ft

243.8 m


United States

New Madrid, Missouri


Chimney of Marl-Chemiepark Power Station

791 ft

241 m


Germany

Marl, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Scholven A Power Station

798 ft

240.5 m


Germany

Gelsenkirchen, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimneys of Luohuang Power Station

787 ft

240 m

1989/2005

People's Republic of China

Chongqing


Chimney of Voerde Power Station

787 ft

240 m


Germany

Voerde, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimneys of Bexbach Power Station

787 ft

240 m


Germany

Bexbach, Saarland


Chimney of Cuno Power Station

787 ft

240 m


Germany

Herdecke, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Allen S King Generating Station

786 ft

239.5 m


United States

Bayport, Minnesota


Chimneys of Navajo Generating Station

775 ft

236.2 m

1997/1998/1999

United States

Page, Arizona


Chimney Inverkip Power Station

774 ft

236 m

1976

United Kingdom

Inverkip, Scotland


Chimney Power Station Schwandorf

771 ft

235 m


Germany

Schwandorf, Bavaria

Demolished

Chimneys of Niederaussem Power Station

768 ft

234 m


Germany

Niederaussem, North Rhine-Westphalia


Сhimney of Petrogal Sines

768 ft

234 m

?

Portugal

Sines


Chimney Heating Power Station Karlsruhe

764 ft

233 m


Germany

Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg


Chimneys Weiher Power Station

761 ft

232 m


Germany

Quierschied-Weiher, Saarland


Chimneys of Kashima Thermal power station

758 ft

231 m

1971

Japan

Ibaraki


Chimney of Plant Gaston

755 ft

230 m

2009

United States

Wilsonville, Alabama


Chimney of Plant Gorgas

755 ft

230 m

2007

United States

Parrish, Alabama


Chimney of Callide 'C' Power Station

755 ft

230 m

2000

Australia

Callide


Chimney of Šoštanj Power Station

755 ft

230 m


Slovenia

Šoštanj


Chimney of Cheswick Power Station

755 ft

230 m

1970

United States

Springdale, Pennsylvania


Chimney of Castrop-Rauxel Power Station

755 ft

230 m


Germany

Castrop-Rauxel, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Voerde Power Station

755 ft

230 m


Germany

Voerde, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Power Plant Lubin

755 ft

230 m


Poland

Lubin


Chimney of New Castle Power Plant

750 ft

228.6 m

1977

United States

New Castle, Pennsylvania


Chimney of Heyden Power Station

745 ft

227 m


Germany

Petershagen, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Heating Power Station Gera-Nord

738 ft

225 m


Germany

Gera, Thuringia


Chimney Power Station Jena

738 ft

225 m


Germany

Jena, Thuringia


Chimney of Power Plant Bielsko Biala

738 ft

225 m

1975

Poland

Czechowice Dziedzice


Chimney of Power Plant Kraków-Leg

738 ft

225 m


Poland

Kraków


Chimney Power Station Asnæsværket

723 ft

220.1 m


Denmark

Kalundborg


Chimney of Moneypoint Generating Station

722 ft

220 m

1985

Ireland

Kilrush

Designed to have a height of 225m, but built to a height of 220m after changes during construction

Chimney of Mittal Steel Ostrava

722 ft

220 m


Czech Republic

Ostrava


Chimney of Počerady Power Station

722 ft

220 m

1977

Czech Republic

Počerady


Chimney of Schilling Power Station

722 ft

220 m

1962

Germany

Stade, Lower Saxony


Chimneys of Bayer-Power Station Leverkusen

722 ft

220 m


Germany

Leverkusen, North Rhine-Westphalia

were used until 1944 as carrier for Bayer Cross Leverkusen

Chimney of Chita Power Plant Units 1-4

722 ft

220 m


Japan

Chita


Chimney of Power Plant Głogów

722 ft

220 m


Poland

Głogów


Chimney of Power Plant Polkowice

722 ft

220 m


Poland

Polkowice


Chimney of Power Plant Toruń

722 ft

220 m


Poland

Toruń


Chimneys of Morgantown Generating Station

718 ft

218.85 m

1970/1971

United States

Newburg, Maryland


Chimney of West Power Station

715 ft

218 m

1970

Germany

Voerde, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney of Pembroke Power Station

713 ft

217.3 m

1968

United Kingdom

Pembroke, Wales

Demolished

Chimney of Shell Pernis

712 ft

216 m

1974

Netherlands

Rotterdam


Chimney of Littlebrook Power Station, Unit 'D'

705 ft

215 m

1981

United Kingdom

Dartford, England


Chimney of the Hongkong Electric Lamma Island Power Plant

705 ft

215 m


Hong Kong

Lamma Island

[2]

Chimney of Richard L. Hearn Thermal Generating Station

705 ft

214.9 m


Canada

Toronto, Ontario


Chimney of Intermountain Power Plant

701 ft

213.67 m

1987

United States

Delta, Utah


Chimney of Plant Miller Units 1&2

700 ft

213.5 m

2010

United States

Quinton, Alabama


Chimney of Plant Miller Units 3&4

700 ft

213.5 m

2009

United States

Quinton, Alabama


Chimney of Rush Island Power Station

700 ft

213.5 m

1975

United States

Festus, Missouri


Chimneys of Lacygne Power Plant

700 ft

213.5 m

1973/1977

United States

Lacygne,Kansas


Chimney of Matla Power Station

700 ft

213.5 m

1979

South Africa

Kriel


Chimney of Iatan Power Plant

700 ft

213.5 m

1980

United States

Iatan, Missouri


Chimney of Oswego Generating Station

700 ft

213.5 m

1980

United States

Oswego, New York


Chimney of Nebraska City Power Station

700 ft

213.5 m

1978

United States

Nebraska City, Nebraska


Chimney of Oswego Generating Station, Unit 5

700 ft

213.5 m

1976

United States

Oswego, New York


Chimneys of Labadie Power Station

700 ft

213.5 m

1970/1972

United States

Labadie, Missouri


Chimney of Alma Power Station

700 ft

213.5 m


United States

Alma, Wisconsin


Chimney of Sibley Generating Station

700 ft

213.3 m

1967

United States

Sibley, Missouri


Chimney of Power Plant Kielce

699 ft

213 m


Poland

Kielcei


Chimney of Tarong North Power Station

689 ft

210 m

2001

Australia

Tarong


Chimney of Stanwell Power Station

689 ft

210 m

1993

Australia

Stanwell


Chimney of Callide Power Station, Unit 'B'

689 ft

210 m

1988

Australia

Callide


Chimney of Tarong Power Station

689 ft

210 m

1986

Australia

Tarong


Chimney of Toshima Incinerator

689 ft

210 m

1999

Japan

Ikebukuro, Tokyo


Chimney of Guangdong Yudean Jinghai Power Generation Station

689 ft

210 m

2007

People's Republic of China

Jieyang


Chimney of Guangdong Red Bay Generation Powerplant

689 ft

210 m

2006

People's Republic of China

Shanwei


Chimney of Zhanjiang Aoliyou Powerplant

689 ft

210 m

2005

People's Republic of China

Zhanjiang


Chimney of Huaneng Shantou Powerplant

689 ft

210 m

1996

People's Republic of China

Shantou


Chimney Power Station Moers-Meerbeck

689 ft

210 m


Germany

MoersMeerbeck, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney Power Station Dortmund-Derne

689 ft

210 m


Germany

Dortmund-Derne, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney Karlsruhe

689 ft

210 m


Germany

Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg


Chimney of Gustav Knepper Power Station

689 ft

210 m


Germany

Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimneys of Poolbeg Generating Station

680 ft

207.3 m

1970 / 1978

Ireland

Dublin


Chimney of Plant Hammond

675 ft

205.8 m

2008

United States

Coosa, Georgia


Chimney of Plant Bowen Units 1&2

675 ft

205.8 m

2008

United States

Cartersville, Georgia


Chimney of Plant Bowen Units 3&4

675 ft

205.8 m

2007

United States

Cartersville, Georgia


Chimney of Plant Wansley

675 ft

205.8 m

2007

United States

Roopville, Georgia


Chimney of Zinifex Smelter (Zinifex Smelter Stack)

673 ft

205 m


Australia

Port Pirie


Fina Antwerp Olefins Flare

673 ft

205 m


Belgium

Antwerp


Chimney of Ironbridge Power Station

673 ft

205 m

1970

United Kingdom

Ironbridge, England


Chimney of Slovalco

669 ft

204 m


Slovakia

Žiar nad Hronom


Chimney of Mondi Business Paper SCP

669 ft

204 m


Slovakia

Ružomberok


Chimney of MVM Észak-Buda Power Station

666 ft

203 m

1974

Hungary

Budapest


Chimney Power Station Franken II

663 ft

202 m

1963/64

Germany

Erlangen, Bavaria

Demolished in 2001

Chimneys of Eraring Power Station

656 ft

200 m

1982/83

Australia

Eraring


Chimney of Simmering Power Station, Unit 3

656 ft

200 m

1990

Austria

Vienna


Chimney of Cementárna Maloměřice

656 ft

200 m


Czech Republic

Brno


Chimney of Škoda Auto

656 ft

200 m


Czech Republic

Mladá Boleslav


Chimney of Mělník Power Station

656 ft

200 m

1980

Czech Republic

Horní Počaply


Chimney of Ledvice Power Station

656 ft

200 m

1969

Czech Republic

Ledvice


Chimney of Počerady Power Station

656 ft

200 m


Czech Republic

Počerady


Chimney of Spolana Neratovice

656 ft

200 m


Czech Republic

Neratovice


Stadtwerketurm

656 ft

200 m

1967

Germany

Duisburg, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney Power Station Mannheim-Neckarau

656 ft

200 m


Germany

MannheimNeckarau, Baden-Württemberg


Chimney Ludwigshafen

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Ludwigshafen, Rhineland-Palatinate


Chimney Leverkusen

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Leverkusen, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney Essen-Karnap

656 ft

200 m


Germany

EssenKarnap, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimney Power Station Hamm-Schmehausen

656 ft

200 m


Germany

HammSchmehausen, North Rhine-Westphalia


Chimneys of Frimmersdorf Power Station

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Frimmersdorf, North Rhine-Westphalia


Cooling tower of Niederaussem Power Station

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Niederaußem, North Rhine-Westphalia

World's tallest cooling tower

Chimney of Irsching Power Station

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Irsching, Bavaria


Chimney Breitungen

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Breitungen, Thuringia


Chimneys Wilhelmshaven

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Wilhelmshaven, Lower Saxony


Chimney of Schkopau Power Station

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Schkopau, Saxony-Anhalt


Chimney of Schwedt Power Station

656 ft

200 m


Germany

Schwedt, Brandenburg


Chimney of Hekinan Power Plant, Units 1-3

656 ft

200 m

1990

Japan

Hekinan


Chimney of Sakaide Power Plant, Units 2-4

656 ft

200 m

1971

Japan

Sakaide


Chimney of Anan Power Plant

656 ft

200 m


Japan

Anan


Chimney of Atsumi Power Plant

656 ft

200 m


Japan

Atsumi


Chimney of Chita Daini Power Plant

656 ft

200 m


Japan

Chita


Chimney of Chita Power Plant

656 ft

200 m


Japan

Chita


Chimney of New Plymouth Power Station

656 ft

200 m

1972

New Zealand

New Plymouth


Chimney of Power Plant Katowice

656 ft

200 m


Poland

Katowice


Chimney of Power Plant Zabrze

656 ft

200 m


Poland

Zabrze


Chimney of Power Station Kozienice

656 ft

200 m


Poland

Kozienice


Chimney of Power Plant Bedsin-Lagisza

656 ft

200 m


Poland

BedsinLagisza


Chimney of Power Station Patnow

656 ft

200 m


Poland

Patnow


Chimney of Power Station Poznań-Karolin

656 ft

200 m


Poland

PoznańKarolin


Chimney of Power Station Warszawa-Siekierki

656 ft

200 m


Poland

WarsawSiekierki


Chimney of Power Station Gdańsk

656 ft

200 m


Poland

Gdańsk


Chimney of Power Station Warszawa-Zeran

656 ft

200 m


Poland

WarsawZeran


Solar Tower Manzanares

656 ft

200 m

1989

Spain

Manzanares

Destroyed

Sant Adria de Besos Power Station

656 ft

200 m

1976

Spain

Sant Adria de Besos


Chimney of Fiddlers Ferry Power Station

656 ft

200 m

1971

United Kingdom

Widnes, England


Gibson Generating Station

655 ft

199.7 m

2005

United States

Owensville, Indiana

One of the newest entries

Port Kembla Copper Stack

650 ft

198 m

1965

Australia

Port Kembla, New South Wales

Scheduled to be demolished in 2010

Chimney of Tušimice Power Station

643 ft

196 m

1964

Czech Republic

Tušimice

Demolished on November 27, 2005 by explosives

Gibson Generating Station

626 ft

195.6 m

2006

United States

Owensville, Indiana


Chimney of Tepláreň

607 ft

185 m


Slovakia

Zvolen


Chimney of Plant Barry

600 ft

183 m

2009

United States

Bucks, Alabama


Chimney of Brunner Island Power Plant

600 ft

183 m

2008

United States

York Haven, Pennsylvania


Chimney of Coleson Cove Generating Station

600 ft

183 m

2004

Canada

Saint John, New Brunswick


Chimney of Seward Power Plant

600 ft

183 m

1921

United States

Seward, Pennsylvania


Chimney of Coleson Cove Generating Station

600 ft

183m

1976

Canada

Saint John, New Brunswick

Two chimneys

Chimney of Senoko Power Station

597 ft

182 m

1976

Singapore

Singapore

Two chimneys Stages II and III

( Stage II chimney demolition completed in July 2010 )

Chimney of Tychy CHP Power Plant

591 ft

180 m

1976

Poland

Tychy


Chimney of Duck Creek Power Plant

588 ft

179.3 m

2008

United States

Canton, Illinois


Anaconda Smelter Stack

585 ft

178.3 m

1919

United States

Anaconda, Montana

Tallest brick chimney in the world

Chimney of Monroe Power Plant

580 ft

176.8 m

2007

United States

Monroe, Michigan


Chimney of Suginami Incinerator

524 ft

160 m

1982

Japan

Suginami, Tokyo


Chimney of Petrochema

524 ft

160 m

1989

Slovakia

Dubová


Chimney of ASARCO

492 ft

155 m

1929

Mexico

Nueva Rosita

Chimney built of bricks, actually the government is building a huge park around it, and a laser will be placed at the top.

Chimneys of Moss Landing Power Plant

500 ft

153 m

1964

United States

Moss Landing, California

Two chimneys

Chimney of Volkswagen

492 ft

150 m


Slovakia

Bratislava


Chimney of Senoko Incineration Plant

492 ft

150 m

1992

Singapore

Singapore

Two chimneys

Chimney of Novaky Power Plant-B, Units 1 + 2

492 ft

150 m

1963

Slovakia

Nováky


Incel Chimney

492 ft

150 m

?

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Banja Luka


Halsbrücker Esse

459 ft

140 m

1889

Germany

Halsbrücke

Chimney built of bricks

Port Dundas Townsend Chimney

454 ft

138.4 m

1859

United Kingdom

Glasgow, Scotland

Chimney built of bricks

Chimneys of Morro Bay Power Plant[4]

450 ft

137.1 m

1955

United States

Morro Bay, California

Three chimneys

Heleneholmsverket [5]

427 ft

130 m

1991

Sweden

Malmö


Cheminée du Front de Seine

427 ft

130 m

1973

France

Paris


Many lower chimneys